Forbes hits a new low, claims non-GMO movement is somehow mired in sexism

You can always tell when a Leftist is losing an argument. They always resort to false accusations of “isms” as a way to distract from the fact that their viewpoint has no substance and no basis in reality.

Enter Kavin Senapathy, who inferred in Forbes recently that anyone who disputes Big Agriculture’s claim that “all genetically modified foods are good” is a (wait for it) sexist.

Well, at least we’re not bigots and homophobes.

Yet.

Senapathy, whose self-appointed claim to fame is exposing “quackery”while busting “myths on health, food and science,” has an undergrad degree in business marketing from the University of Wisconsin and does not appear to have any special scientific education or training whatsoever. And while she frequently blogs about food and science – or “sciencey” stuff – she now appears to be adding the title of “sociologist” to her resume. [RELATED: For the first time, bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides are now being found in drinking water]

Writing for Forbes is actually the perfect way to shill for the biotech industry, since that’s all Forbes does. And Senapathy is one of the industry’s biggest shills, hanging out with the fine marketing folks at GMO giant Monsanto, as noted by Vani Hari, the Food Babe, in this post.

But I digress. On to the sexism.

Senapathy doesn’t just cite one alleged instance of sexism in the non-GMO movement, but three:

— She accuses Jeffrey Smith of being anti-women for pointing out in a 2015 video that mothers who have children suffering from chronic conditions, or those attempting to prevent their kids from suffering a chronic illness, should be educated about why they should stop serving GMO foods.

Because, you know, it’s sexist to not include fathers in that recommendation. Kavin declares it.

— Next she goes after Moms Across America founder Zen Honeycutt for daring to warn other mothers about the dangers of glyphosate – the main ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide – for potentially having caused her son’s autism symptoms, but which disappeared after switching him to an all-organic diet. Senapathy says that sexist story (Honeycutt was directing her education efforts at other mothers) is “implausible,” but … whoops. An MIT (that’s a pretty elite school, Kavin) Ph.D says she’s found a very plausible link between glyphosate and autism. It has also been linked to other medical illnesses including cancer; even the United Nations thinks so.

But since Honeycutt didn’t educate men too, well, sexist!

— Gary Hirshberg, a verified man and founder of the non-GMO lobbying organization Just Label It, was next up in Senapathy’s sociology crosshairs. She writes:

Its ongoing “conceal or reveal” campaign uses celebrity moms like Gwyneth Paltrow, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Ginnifer Goodwin, Sarah Gilbert, Jillian Michaels and more to plant the narrative that moms in particular have a “right to know” if food ingredients are genetically engineered. The campaign purports to speak for all moms, with sounds bites from the celebs like “You cannot conceal what’s in our kids’ food. No mom is okay with that.”

She goes on to note that “scientist, farmer, and communicator moms (including me)” wrote a letter in 2015 to these celebrity mothers to defend for GMOs. The letter is here.

Notice what’s missing? Dads.

So that must mean that Senapathy herself is a sexist, along with all those other sciencey-type communicator moms who signed her GMO industry defense letter, right?

Ri-i-i-ght.

So, not only is Senapathy a poor shill, but she’s a hypocrite too.

The real problem with shills is that sooner or later their pattern of shilling in the face of hard, replicable and legitimate scientific evidence proves that they are talking out of their rear ends.

And they are easily discredited.

J.D. Heyes is a senior writer for NaturalNews.com and NewsTarget.com, as well as editor of The National Sentinel.

Sources:

NaturalNews.com

Forbes.com

FoodBabe.com